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The Future of the Mexican Cannabis Industry, Part 2

Nicholas Demski
Written by Nicholas Demski

Will Mexico legalize before USA? How will the market function to keep consumers safe?

Were you ever a child? Of course you were. When you were a wee little one, did anyone ever blame you for something that you didn’t do? Do you remember what it felt like to have that blame and judgment placed on you when you didn’t have the means to voice your truth?

It was probably frustrating. You knew you weren’t to blame, but you couldn’t find the words to express the incorrectness of your accuser.

If you know that feeling, then you probably know how people in Mexico feel when Americans say that our drug problem is their fault.

Do drugs cross the border from Mexico to the United States? Yes. But it’s not just a Mexican problem.

In fact, Mexico seems to be taking bigger steps to change the drug culture than even the United States.

As it currently stands, less than a quarter of the American states still maintain cannabis as completely illegal in all its forms. Of course, the federal government recently legalized hemp and its derivatives while rescheduling CBD, as well.

Despite all those efforts, however, Mexico may quickly jump out ahead of the United States within the next few months.

Here’s how.

First, the Mexican supreme court set a jurisprudence that prohibition of cannabis is unconstitutional. Then, in 2018, the people elected AMLO (Andrés Manuel López Obrador), a Bernie Sanders-style politician who has promised to legalize cannabis. After his election, the legislature also indicated their willingness to legalized cannabis. More recently, Mexico announced it would like to legalize all drugs in an effort with the United States to curb the violence in the War on Drugs.

That’s a lot to process. Essentially, expect Mexico to officially legalize cannabis before the end of the summer when their legislative session ends for 2019.

What does this mean for the future Mexican market, however? Will there be adequate testing services for the newly legalized market when it comes to fruition?

Thankfully, labs like Steep Hill have already started their migration south of the US border and into Mexico. It seems that some companies are thinking ahead and want to make sure that future countries to legalize also have safe products to offer consumers.

Mexico might have been taking the blame for drugs for a long time, but the truth is, they’re now out in front of American policy, especially if their politicians keep their promises.

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Nicholas Demski

Nicholas Demski

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